Thursday, August 18, 2016

Simpson Desert Bike Challenge

Combining overland adventure travel with remote endurance sports makes for a very exciting trip...

In 2016, I will be riding across the Australian Simpson Desert as part of a charity ride for the Australian Royal Flying Doctor Service.


Read more about the adventure: SDBC2016


Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Pioneers, Settlers and Town Planners

Pioneers, Settlers and Town Planners - my light hearted approach to the various roles overlanders have.
Overlanders: Pioneers, Settlers and Town Planners

In the world of independent overland travel we have those that are pioneers, settlers and town planners.

Initially I used the concept of Values Model, which is a tool to group population by values.
This concept then evolved and I have based it on the original concept of Pioneers, Settlers and Town Planners from Simon Wardley (including modifying his diagram. All credit goes to Simon). This version translates the wonderful world of independent overland travel into three categories, namely Pioneers, Settlers and Town Planners.
Pioneers push the boundaries…
Pioneers are able to explore never before discovered trans-continental borders and boundaries for overland travel.  They open new routes, travel fast, share frequently via social media and create buzz and influence dreams.  Often they fade fast once the destination is reached and often don't leave much history for those who follow. Generally always find an overland way regardless of the countries before them.


Settlers commodise those boundaries…
Settlers can turn the half baked thing (that grape vine pioneer border crossing or route) and turn it into something useful for a larger audience.  They build trust from the content they create.  They make the possible future actually happen.  They broaden the routes, travel slower and often longer.  Often share infrequently but indepth, often via books. History is vital. They get to know other settlers often crisscrossing paths multiple times.  Once the primary journey is done, they settle into a life as overlanders often re-living memories and planning future trips.  They contribute to the community.


Town Planners create foundations...
Town Planners build, often in the vehicle & accessory industry. They build a strong brand, leave a legacy and contribute passionately and often build empires focused on them. They find ways to make things faster, better, smaller and good enough. They build the platform that settlers require.
They contribute vocally across diverse media (print and online), organise communities & gatherings and optimise the arm chair traveler.


The overland industry needs brilliant people in each of those roles all contributing to the joys of independent overland travel.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Instagram update: Digidrift (live from the Congo)

Social media has changed the way overlanders communicate and share information... gone are the days of the 'Travel grape vine' - hello realtime updates!

Jason and Liza are currently travelling through the Congo with 'Smokey the Bear', their Land Cruiser Troopy.    Here are a few Instagram updates worth reading and seeing...



Friday, June 19, 2015

The excitement of planning a trip…

How often do we hear the statement that it’s the journey not the destination that counts. Prior to any journey commencing is the planning – this is were the fun begins!
A journey between two locations can be extremely dull and mundane unless planned in advance. The planning – creating a trip budget, researching routes and cross referencing overlanders opinions – extends the journey by adding days, weeks or months of pre-trip planning. The excitement, the anxiety and dealing with the negative soothsayers heightens the senses, evolving the planning into the journey itself.

My excitement for an upcoming trip is brewing. In late September 2015, I will be heading back to the Australian outback to cross the Simpson Desert (West to East) in support of the Simpson Desert Mountain Bike Challenge event. The cycle event, now in its 27th year, is a multi-day stage race for endurance mountain bikers. The route varies each year, with each day divided into two stages. A morning stage, which starts at 6am and an afternoon stage starting at 2pm. The distance covered is roughly 100km per day. A sweeper vehicle ensures that riders make the time cutoff and contributes to the pressure of finishing the stage in the allocated time.
Simpson Desert Bike Challenge - 2015 Route


Friday, June 12, 2015

The evolving rooftop tent... make way for the camper!

Have your thoughts about your overland travel sleeping habits evolved yet?
Camper vs Rooftop Tent?
Ask many seasoned overlanders and a few will start to admit that the idea of a rooftop tent is fading and that the comforts of a permanent bed plus cooking area is very attractive.  The proof point are overlanders on a second extended trans-continental trip... like  Lost World Expedition. Luis & Lacey moved from a Land Cruiser 60 Series to a Mercedes Sprinter van.

I admit, I fall into the latter group.  The rooftop tent was great when it was just the wife and I. Living outside the vehicle, and sleeping on the roof,  in a warm climate made sense.  Years later, my family has grown and my enthusiasm for setting up a dusty rooftop tent and climbing ten ladder rungs has faded.  I want a setup that is quick, self contained and has that extra level of comfort for the family (so as to keep encouraging them to venture to new unknown places).

What I do long for is the ability to use a cabin type arrangement, like a demountable (truck camper), for my family trips and the freedom to use the base vehicle for those remote trips where sometimes the family won't be as interested (i.e. short weekends with lots of driving exploring new routes).

A modified Land Cruiser Troopy makes a lot of sense.  It can comfortably sleep 3 people, and could be used as a daily vehicle.  Aussie Overlanders had a neatly setup interior - perfect for a couple.
Photo Credit: Aussie Overlanders


Thursday, June 4, 2015

Trip Report: A Rant & A Rave...

It was the perfect start to the week. The Hema map was folded open, Memory-Map (an Android GPS app) was loaded with the NSW topographical 25K map and a website loaded highlighting GPS tracks in the area zoned for the upcoming weekend 4x4 trip.

It's winter in the Southern Hemisphere so the enthusiasm by the extended group to head into remote areas camping was rather limited which resulted in only two vehicles (a Jeep Rubicon & a Land Cruiser Prado) departing Friday evening for a remote camping spot in the Jenolan State Forest.

This was to be our third trip to Jenolan having first found the camping spot back in 2012 and again in 2013.

A message to all those who love bushcamping... remember those who follow!


Friday, May 1, 2015

The Range Rover Experience...

Held in prestige, the Range Rover has been the vehicle choice for upper class Britain and her shrinking Commonwealth for decades. Feature rich and capable, the 1970 introduction of a permanent 4wd mid sized vehicle encouraged trans-continental overland explorers to adopt and prove the capability of the new Land Rover brand. The 1971 crossing of the Darien Gap by Range Rover, led by Colonel John Blashford-Snell, proved the Range Rover but required plenty of air support to fly in axles and other important items that needed re-engineering.
Photo Credit: Range Rover Classic Website
Roll on the 1980's and Range Rover needed a new proving ground for their vehicles.  The Camel Trophy, only a year old, introduced the Range Rover as the flagship 4x4.  Not many vehicles exist after the event as it was rumoured that Land Rover had all the participant vehicles crushed.
Source: http://facepunch.com/showthread.php?t=1126885
Although capable, this vehicle has not inspired independent overlanders to adopt it as a trusted platform, preferring the rugged Defender and even the Discovery.
The question remains: Why is the Range Rover not popular?  A fact: the Mercedes G-Wagen has more trans-Africa trips associated with it than the Range Rover!
Range Rover vs Defender 110


TV Series: Breaking Loose - A family in Search of Roots

Jusalulu
Five years ago, Luca and Sameena (plus two kids), departed Italy for Pakistan via North Africa.  The orange Fiat truck became their home for two years, during which they filmed the journey,  the highs and lows of trans-continental overland travel.

The TV Series has just been released with a wonderful introduction about the journey.  Unfortunately, the Vimeo clip can't be embedded so head over to GA&A:  Breaking Loose - A Family in Search of Roots

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Land Rover Defender Mini Rig

Aussie Overlanders: Mini Rigs
The Land Rover Defender might be likened to the old Meccano set of parts. Hundreds of misaligned objects that actually resemble something. Having owned two Land Rover Series models and a single Defender before, and knowing how easy it is to 'tinker' and make various modifications to the base vehicle, I have been left with a desire to rebuild a Series II Landy. Thankfully, I have not needed to go from zero capability to full rebuild without the ability to practice on slightly smaller options. Introducing the Mini Rig Defender: